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#bodiesSee More Fat People

5 comments | December 30th, 2011

50s chestist

(Story submitted anonymously, by a Chestist)

One reader writes us with this:

I'd love to see more fat people on TV. In most shows I've watched it seems like very few characters are fat.

Sometimes a TV show will basically have one token fat person, like Lost or Glee. It seems rare to have multiple fat characters unless the show is specifically about fat people.

Occasionally I'll be watching a TV show and when a person who is even a little bit fat does appear someone I'm watching with will comment that they're fat like it's some sort of novelty.

It would be nice to see enough fat people on TV that it wasn't remarkable. {end story}

We've talked about this before, but not in a while.  What would you like to see more of (or less of) reflected in popular culture?  DO you see you?  How's it make you feel?  

#bodiesCoverGirl, Taylor Swift and The Self Esteem Act.

1 response | December 22nd, 2011

TSEA

We think it's great that CoverGirl is taking down their Taylor Swift ads because the lashes they show and the lashes you get have nothing to do with each other.  But is the lie they told photographically any more or less significant than the lies any ad or editorial that's photoshopped and digitally-manipulated the human body shows?  Here @OOC HQ, we don't think so. We think it'd be even greater, and help a lot more girls and women (to say nothing of boys and men) feel good about themselves, if truth-in-advertising was proactive and not reactive, and not simply done because and after you've been caught. Photoshopping isn't necessarily bad. Pretending the ideal is real and attainable when it's not is bad, and the consequences of it can be dire. If you agree, and if you support transparency and truth-in-advertising, we hope you'll sign and forward this:

 

http://www.change.org/petitions/congress-sponsor-and-pass-the-self-esteem-act?share_id=KhdxhnxDwt&pe=pce

#bodiesThe Self-Esteem Act is Dumb

26 comments | December 2nd, 2011

bam

(submitted by lailainthecity)

We're all about diversity of opinions here @ Camp OOC...even the ones we don't agree with.  Imagine!  That said, there's a lot in Laialinthecity's comments we do agree with.  The first paragraph pretty much entirely.  As for the rest, well, for us, not so much.  But you decide for you, and let us and Laila know what you think. Here's what she does:

The "Self-Esteem Act"? Why do we have to keep lowering the bar for everything, and making it law no less? When I see someone svelte walking down the street, I don't ask them if they're wearing Spanx. When I see someone with a smile that lights up the room, I don't ask them if they're caps. When I see someone with waist length full bodied curly hair, I don't ask if it's a lace-front wig. Because the truth about what they look like when they get up in the morning, doesn't belong to me, it belongs to them. There's plenty of artifice in world, it starts with lip gloss when you're a teenager. So what?

Nobody is perfect, that should be common sense, ...

#bodiesHow Much Do I Weigh Now

8 comments | December 1st, 2011

ona scale

(by OOC via TheGirlProject)

We first bumped into these amazing images of teenaged girls a few months back, all of which can be found in Please Read (If At All Possible): The Girl Project, by Kate Engelbrecht.

Since we both like a good cliche and happen to believe that a picture can actually be worth 1000 words, we'll be featuring a handful of images from the book over the next week.  We're hoping you'll share with us what words (even if not 1000 of them) come to mind...what they make you think of, and how they make you feel.

Our first reactions here @OOC HQ, will serve as the titles for these posts.

To check out more of The Girl Project and Kate's work,

please also check out:

http://thegirlprojectblog.blogspot.com/

http://www.pleasereadifatallpossible.blogspot.com/

#bodiesIs Fat a Disease?

7 comments | November 12th, 2011

dude, wtf

(story submitted anonymously, by a Chestist)

I'm so frustrated!

I hate that there are so many people, who like me, are overweight. And so many people, not like me but just like me, who are underweight. Obese. Fat. Underweight. Skinny. A disease. Imagine defining the way someone looks as a disease.

Imagine your respected doctor or health professional telling you your appearance is a disease. How is that legal? Why do we allow that?

My diet might be a problem. My activity might be a problem. Maybe I'm not doing healthy things, maybe I have an eating disorder, but the way I look is not the actual issue. The issue is that my body image is terrible because airbrushed magazines give other people and myself unreasonable goals and doctors like you validate them by telling me I look like a disease and that's the problem.  {end story.}

You ever had a doctor - or some professional - say something to you where you were all WTF?!  When?  What'd you do or say back? 

#bodies…A Stupid Waste of Time

17 comments | November 9th, 2011

stupid waste

(By OOC and via TheGirlRevolution.com)

So you might have heard about The Self-Esteem Act we've proposed, requiring "Truth in Advertising" labeling be attached to any ad or editorial that meaningfully changes the human form through digital manipulation, like photoshopping.  It's our hope that the Act might help contribute to stemming the epidemic cirsis of confidence affecting girls and women.  Not everyone agrees with us.

We bumped into the story below (reposted here with the author's permission) at TheGirlRevolution.com.  We love their site, their vision and mission, and everything they're trying to do.  We also love that they disagree with us so openly and productively and allowed us to disagree with them, equally. 

A large part of what we're hoping to accomplish with and through The Self-Esteem Act is to help mainstream a conversation about the aforementioned epidemic  - because no matter what the right answers are, they'll happen faster and with greater scale if the problems come to be understood and recognized at a mainstream level. Dissent (productive dissent) helps do this. 

And, we don't pretent to suggest that the act is the final answer or ...

#bodiesSupport The Self-Esteem Act. Come on.

comment | October 31st, 2011

Screen shot 2011-10-05 at 2.35.04 PM

#bodiesAsk A Woman Who Knows

16 comments | September 1st, 2011

new chestist

(story submitted anonymously, by a 34 year-old Chestist)

My Message: When ever I see stories about young women even girls wanting or getting breast enlargements thinking it will somehow improve their life, I think, why do they never talk to the women who grew up with large breasts. Their response might suprise them.

 

I round up my height to 5'2' and currently wear a 32 DD. I've been wearing a bra since the 3rd grade. As a young girl I was automatically considered a slut, because apprently if you have large breasts it must be true. So I tried to hide it with large shirts.  To this day I still feel uncomfortable wearing tight shirts. Not to mention it's not easy to find a reasonably priced bra that is a 32 DD. You can't just go into Target.

 

And chances are its not going to be "sexy" looking at least if your goal is to have them remain in your bra when you bend over to tie your shoe. Large breasts tend to prevent you from wearing certain clothes--button up shirts, no way; strapless, you'll do a lot of ...

#bodiesSay Cheese

50 comments | August 30th, 2011

cheese

(story by the amazing @MIr from Woulda Coulda Shoulda.com)

A few years back, my mother gave me my baby book. Inside I found twelve years of school pictures, and with them I could make a virtual flip book to page through my formative years. I could watch my hair go from short to long and back again. I could watch my wide, happy smile go from baby teeth to a jumbled mixture of permanent and temporary teeth and then... my smile disappeared for a while. It returns---post-orthodontia---at the end of high school. But even then, it's different.

It's not just that my teeth are straight in the later photos, either. You can see that I don't smile as widely or easily as I used to. The unselfconscious glee from my early days is just gone.

There's an argument to be made that very few of us retain our happy-go-lucky "oh yay, a camera! LOOK AT ME!" joy past kindergarten. Age and maturity mellow and dilute our enthusiasm, of course. But for me it wasn't just a getting-older thing. It was a growing awareness of my teeth and how prominent they were.

"Don't ...

#chestismsWe’re All FLAWD

12 comments | June 25th, 2011

flawd

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 "Once you accept the fact that you're not perfect, then you develop some confidence." ~ Rosalynn Carter

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