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I’d rather my daughter smoke weed than read Seventeen

56 comments | April 2nd, 2013

(submitted by seth@OOC)

We originally posted this in May of 2011.  While the specificity of Ann’s hypocricy has since passed, we think the breadth of Seventeen’s hypocrisy continues.  Be who you are – but don’t pretend to be something else.

Our daughter’s a year older…but nothing has changed enough to cause us to change our title, premise, nor belief. (5.3.12. and again on 4.2.13)

This is Ann Shoket, Seventeen magazine’s editor.  I hear she’s very nice. But I also think this picture, which is (note: it was) her twitter profile pic, is a ridunkulous display of hypocrisy and moral convenience.  I don’t think you get to bitchslap the pressure to be perfect in a profile pic AT THE SAME TIME you’re yelling “PERFECT HAIR all summer” on your magazine’s cover, and promoting a “bonus mag” that screams: “BODY“, “Makeover“; Flat Abs!  A great butt!  Amazing legs! Yummy Recipes!“.  That’s.  Just.  Not.  Cool.

Maybe it’s just me, but you just shouldn’t get to position yourself as part of the solution when you’re still an on-going part of the problem.

And Seventeen’s a part of the problem.  In my opinion, they’re a big part of the problem.  In my opinion, they have a lot to do with the fact that 7 out of 10 girls feel they’re not “good enough”.  I think they’ve been and are a prime-mover in the epidemic crisis of confidence infecting so many young girls – and the women they grow up to be.   (If you want more data, and to be absolutely horrified about the state of self-esteem among girls, check out Dove’s Real Girls, Real Pressures study here.)

But here’s the thing, we’re all complicit until we do something more about it.  This crisis of confidence is our individual and collective responsibility (and it’s not just girls facing the crisis).  Until Seventeen’s the only available choice or voice, the tragic state of self-esteem among young women is as much about the decisions we – all of us – do and don’t make as parents, sisters, brothers, friends, neighbors, teachers, consumers, viewers, readers, ticket buyers, and the sellers of same, as it is the ones Seventeen and Ann make.

And like Ann, a lot of us have complicated relationships with conscience and commerce, and with the business of popular culture and the so-called standards, norms and ideals it creates and promotes (and the ones it doesn’t too).  Hollywood, as I’ve said in this space before, built our house, is paying for our kids’ education, the laptop this is being written on, and this very site (thank you, Hollywood).  I love me some popular culture AND the industry(s) that make it.

But the industry and its players – ones including Ann and Seventeen – can do so much more good.  They just have to choose to.

I’m not saying Seventeen’s all bad.  In fact, I’ve got friends that like the magazine and think Ann’s swell.  Seventeen’s content isn’t 100% inaccessible aspiration and fantasy, ideals and expectations, just largely.  They slip in the right words, and there’s always an article or 2 about embracing the beauty of differences and relishing imperfections. To me, however, that’s a defensive posture, the equivalent of McDonald’s telling you to watch your caloric intake, and the editorial equivalent of tokenism.  Don’t get me wrong, I like inaccessible aspiration and fantasy as much as anyone.  Aspirations, imagination, experimentation, it’s all good.  I love Harry Potter. I too want to be thinner and healthier and “never have frizzy hair ever again.”  Really I do, and sometimes it really all is in good fun.

But sometime’s it’s not – it’s just business as usual. Seventeen does good business, and Ann does a good job as their editor, maybe even a great one.  But why not choose to be a more active part of the solution and a less active part of the problem?  Be a little more like Ryan Murphy and Glee or Ellen or Oprah or Dan Savage and It Gets Better or Lady Gaga (whose message is frequently – and understandably – overshadowed by her meat dress).  Do just a little less evil, to paraphrase Google’s line about doing no evil at all.

But until then, Ann, we think you should change your picture.   You can’t sell beauty (and a very slim picture of its possibilities), make overs, dreams, and fantasies and then position yourself as an ally in the fight against the very pressures to be perfect that you helped create in the first place.  Unless you’re ok with talking out of both sides of your mouth.

I don’t think you are – but you should still change your picture.  Like I said before, I hear you’re really nice – but you should change your picture.  In my opinion, of course.  But then again, I’d rather my daughter smoke weed than read Seventeen.  I think weed’s less dangerous to her health and happiness than Seventeen, and I think I’d really prefer she be under the influence of the former then the latter, especially since she shouldn’t be driving with either.  She’s only 5, but you get my point.

Love is indeed louder than the pressure to be perfect (which is Demi Lovato’s excellent campaign), though it may not be louder than Seventeen.  If you agree that maybe Ann’s trying to have it both ways championing a solution to problems she helps create, join in and all together now we’ll chant “Change your picture!  Change your picture!  Change your picture!”  It’s not as catchy a chant as I’d like, but it gets to the point.   Maybe she’ll change her picture.  I mean a picture’s easy…we’re not suggesting they change the entirety of the magazine, just acknowledge your responsibility.

Ann’s changing her picture won’t mean much in and of itself but maybe it’ll mean something, and that would be “pretty amazing”.

If you don’t agree, or have anything to add, as always please tell us, we want to know.  Maybe I’m wrong; maybe you love or loved Seventeen and have wildly healthy body-confidence, self-esteem…and great hair too.  Maybe your daughter reads it, loves it and is happy and healthy and good. I hope so.  I’d love to be wrong, because I really don’t want ER smoking weed either.

But if you agree with the premise, let’s see if together we can convince Ann to change her picture – by showing her there are enough people who think she should.  You can RT our tweet to Ann here.  Let’s get our social media on and #changeit, shall we?

For my daughter (and son) and all the other girls (and boys) out there, thanks for thinking about it, seth.

P.S. A good editor, like Ann, would have done wonders for this piece, so if you know of any hit us at TalkToUs@OffOurChests.com

 

 

56 comments

  • MCS

    Posted on June 24, 2011

    YES
    #changeit

    Report this comment

  • Anonymous

    Posted on June 24, 2011

    I read Seventeen religiously when I was growing up. I loved it and I’m doing fine.

    Report this comment

    • Penny Rene

      Posted on June 24, 2011

      Doing so fine that you can’t put your name to your comment? I resect your opinion, but it carries no credibility if you can’t own it.

      Report this comment

    • pb

      Posted on August 26, 2011

      I did too – and it did make me feel less than cuz I was never small enough to wear the styles in them, even if my mom could have afforded them…

      Report this comment

  • CD

    Posted on June 24, 2011

    HAH! RTing now.

    Report this comment

  • Big Surprise

    Posted on June 24, 2011

    What a shock, someone in the media not being consistent. Next thing you’ll tell us is Anthony Weiner’s becoming a eunuch. Making something out of nothing. Move on.

    Report this comment

  • Suebob

    Posted on June 24, 2011

    Your link doesn’t work for me.

    Report this comment

  • Cayla

    Posted on June 24, 2011

    I do understand the harsh feelings you are giving Ann Shoket about this Photo and her Hippocratic statement. but not all of it is valid.if you do read the Seventeen magazine there are some beauty tips in there but there are also articles about body image and loving your self for who you are and they also have this statement you can sign in the magazine that simply states “I love myself and my body.” so sometimes i have body issues because of the beautiful models but other times i read the empowering articles that are in the magazine about loving who you are and it helps me get through. So this magazine is not all bad when you actually read it.

    Report this comment

    • OOC

      Posted on June 24, 2011

      Thanks, Cayla. We actually do read the magazine. We are subscribers, in fact, and as we say in the piece, we agree that not all their content is bad. It’s a matter of balance and emphasis. We doubt you’ll be the only person to disagree with us, and we appreciate your adding your voice to the conversation. XO, OOC

      Report this comment

  • Natalie

    Posted on June 24, 2011

    I LOVE this piece. I know these magazines have some positive articles, but most of it is about making girls/women objects!

    Report this comment

  • Sheila

    Posted on June 24, 2011

    I don’t know….
    Don’t you think we should take responsibility for what we buy and listen to? I’m just saying… I get it, though.

    Report this comment

  • Patti

    Posted on June 24, 2011

    I’m kind of over the media being blamed for everything. I’m not a fan of my body, but I blame myself.

    Report this comment

    • OOC

      Posted on June 24, 2011

      Thanks, Patti. At the risk of redundancy…we’re not blaming anyone – we’re blaming (or at least holding accountable) every one. your point that it all starts and stops with us each individually is exactly what we think too.

      But, we do hold the media responsible for what they do and don’t show and say. They make decisions – but ultimately we do too. Thanks, OOC

      Report this comment

      • Jordan

        Posted on April 23, 2014

        Your comment doesn’t make sense; you’re blaming no one and everyone? I think if you’re really about the love and body image and not hating, you’d leave Ann alone and stop supporting the magazine by subscribing. That makes you a bit hypocritical. Instead of getting on the magazine that promotes a healthy body image and actually has the campaign to love your body, maybe you should go after magazines like Vogue. Those models are the ones that have an unreal perception of what a woman should look like. Actually, no, it doesn’t. We come in all shapes, sizes, and colors. How about instead of tearing her down as a woman, support her and her cause.

        Report this comment

  • Eva@OOC

    Posted on June 24, 2011

    We hear you, Patti. We aren’t saying that Seventeen, and other media, are the root of all evil. We just think they have the power to do a lot of good, so why not use it? Thanks for your thoughts. We appreciate it!

    Report this comment

  • Morgan

    Posted on June 24, 2011

    “I’d Rather Have My Daughter Smoke Weed”. That’s funny. Wish you were my dad! :)

    Report this comment

  • Bruce

    Posted on June 24, 2011

    It’s not the job of Seventeen to babysit your or anyone else’s kids. They’re a money making enterprise that lives off the income generated from advertising and that advertising comes from companies who live off selling image improvement.

    I understand what you wish would happen, but I do believe that it takes the focus off where it should be, a parent instilling in their kid right from wrong. That’s the only answer to the influence of media and other people’s kids on your own. For, if you change Seventeen, surely you can’t change the rest of the magazines, television shows and Hollywood.

    Children need to be taught to take pride in their appearance (as well as doing what’s possible to improve that appearance with healthy eating habits) at the same time they are told perfection is not the goal, but, rather, a long life of good health, confidence and happiness. A complicated message to be sure, but one well withing what should be the skill set of any parent. And, if you look at Dove’s research you will see that the number one wish for young girls is better communication with their parents, not a subscription to Seventeen.

    Report this comment

    • OOC

      Posted on June 24, 2011

      Agree completely, Bruce. As we say in the original piece…we’re all complicit. We all as parents, sisters, teachers, brothers…have a role to play. Thanks for jumping in.

      Report this comment

  • Jeannie

    Posted on June 24, 2011

    It is certainly important that parents instill self-love and respect. However, I’d argue that the parents influence has limitations. Peers and the media do have an effect beyond what a parent can control. In fact, some studies show that peers influence personality more than parents (excepting genetics). If this is true, we should care about outside influences.

    Interestingly, when a child commits a crime in western culture, we ask, “what did the parents do?”. In eastern culture, the question is “what did we (as a society) do?”.

    I also would argue that we can hold corporations and the media to a higher standard and get (some)results. If not, we’d still be driving cars without safety belts (and eating McDonalds without those calorie charts – damn them!)

    Report this comment

    • Penny Rene

      Posted on June 27, 2011

      I agree. I think that part of my responsibility as a parent is to use my influence to make the world a better place for my kid. That includes raising the standards of the corporations who publish Seventeen.

      Report this comment

  • blackbird

    Posted on June 24, 2011

    i wonder though, if this picture ann has chosen to put up on twitter is actually her own personal view. the one that she is NOT able to voice as editor of seventeen. i don’t follow ann on twitter nor do i read seventeen any longer, as i had religiously as a teen (more on that later ) but perhaps she is trying to balance the trends of the magazine’s voice with her own, which may or may not always jibe with her employer.

    seventeen is a beauty mag. plain and simple. that industry thrives on the insecurities of girls & women and can only survive with the advertising bought by beauty products. there is no other message to be made by the hundreds of make-up, fitness clothing, perfume and whatever other beautifying product can pay to play in between the magazines pictures of size 2 models.

    the culture of the seventeen would certainly have to change in a sweeping way for the readers to notice the positive reinforcement of feeling good about who you are no matter what size, shape or color. i think it would be a great thing just not sure where the revenue would come from to back up that message and how the magazine could survive. in the end, the bottom line is money. money keeps the magazine going and money comes from the beauty industry and the beauty industry is NOT changing it’s message for none of us.
    ann changing her picture might send a message that we are watching her and take notice but it doesn’t change the way she’ll ever be able to do business at seventeen.

    hopefully, ann shocket has got a mind of her own and does believe the message written on her hands. hopefully, she realizes the damage preaching about perfection causes with impressionable teenage girls (& boys) and she’d really rather on a personal level, passively relay her own message of inclusion and love conquering all – otherwise her hands are dirtier than even she’d like to admit.

    Report this comment

  • Genie

    Posted on June 24, 2011

    I honestly love Seventeen. It’s not about pleasing men or others; those exercises they include in every issue are to promote fitness and being healthy. They always have healthy recipes and how to eat better. Obesity is a serious issue and one that we can’t ignore. Let’s face it; if you’re overweight, you’re at higher risk for heart disease and diabetes and the works! If you take care of your body you will be physically fit and also benefiting in your mental abilities.

    Report this comment

    • Just Asking

      Posted on June 24, 2011

      I am not an avid reader of Seventeen, so I don’t know the answer to this question. Are they promoting exercise and diet as away to health or to look better? Where is the emphasis? Just wondering…

      Report this comment

      • OOC

        Posted on June 24, 2011

        The emphasis is on health, but generally it does tie to looking better…which eating right and exercising can help you do.

        Report this comment

        • Genie

          Posted on June 25, 2011

          So being healthy = looking better. If you tell a teenage girl, hey want to be super healthy? Or, hey want to look hot? She’s going to go for looking hot.
          Also, the emphasis is on health, as there are sometimes sections showing healthy foods that benefit either our mental functioning or for feeling energetic. So, it’s about looking good and feeling good.

          Report this comment

  • blackbird

    Posted on June 24, 2011

    (i used the wrong its. DAMMIT! had to get that in there…)

    Report this comment

  • AMD

    Posted on June 27, 2011

    I read Seventeen when I was growing up and I read Cosmo (gasp!) now. I read the beauty articles and the make up advice. No where in either of those magazines does it say you HAVE to look like this…you HAVE to do that. As far as I’m concerned, it’s all just fun reading for a day at the pool or curled up inside because of rain. I don’t (and never did) take any of it seriously. I read it and forgot all about it. I don’t think she should change her picture, it’s her right to put up what she wants. I read all those teen magazines growing up, as did my friends and we’re all doing great.

    Report this comment

    • OOC

      Posted on June 27, 2011

      Thanks for adding to the conversation, AMD. We appreciate it. You’re right on both counts…it doesn’t say you “have” to do or be anything, and Ann gets to do what she wants (obviously). We’re not making a first amendment argument here.

      So here’s a question…what do you think might be some of the root causes of the crisis of confidence so many young girls (and women) feel?

      We love your disagreement, and appreciate how you disagreed. Even more importantly, we’re really glad you and your friends are great. That will speak louder than any words on anyone’s hands! XO, OOC

      Report this comment

  • Dee

    Posted on June 27, 2011

    I think your article is spot on. No they are not saying ‘you MUST look like this” but a picture is worth a thousand words.

    I read Seventeen for years growing up, and I never saw a girl that looked like me in the magazine anywhere. My parents always instilled a great self-love message in me growing up but as a teenager, when all you’re seeing is slim slender girls of every color, but none have the naturally big thighs/hips/rear end that you have. No amount of working out and dieting could fix that for me.
    I just think in general, the magazine should diversify the message they are sending visually as well as the message they are sending through the context of the magazine.

    Report this comment

  • Francesca Canu

    Posted on June 30, 2011

    bad taste.
    smoking is very dangerous for the health of body and mind, especially for teenagers. it’s proven that it can lead to psychosis.
    sorry but i don’t agree at all with such a pledge.
    a mother can just explain her daughter that a mag like seventeen is full of crap and she should not give any credit to it.
    smoking is a life threatening habit, much more difficult to give up than reading superficial and empty magazines.

    cheers

    Report this comment

    • Anonymous

      Posted on May 22, 2012

      I know this comment is old, but I just can’t let it go…
      Smoking weed is NOT addictive. Tobacco (and the additives put in cigarettes) may be, but not marijuana. Show me evidence that marijuana is “proven that it can lead to psychosis.” I don’t think so.

      I totally agree with the author of this piece. Maybe the messages in Seventeen wouldn’t be quite so mixed if there wasn’t advertising, but then I guess there probably wouldn’t be a magazine. I found myself cringing at the ads in National Geographic Kids as my 6 year old was reading it the other day!

      Report this comment

      • Caroline

        Posted on June 28, 2013

        I know this comment is old, but I can’t let it go. There are dangers to smoking weed. You can pass them off because of your own inability to believe scientific fact or realize that an unmonitored drug may be laced with something else that is addictive or your misunderstanding that abusing any substance (food can be addictive too for the right personality) can lead to an addiction. I don’t mean to attack, but I strongly dislike it when people disregard something that is dangerous when misused out of lack of understanding. Comments like this are what lead children into misunderstanding the consequences of drug abuse.

        Either way, to jump onto this article as a whole, I would never want my child to do one thing, like smoking weed, in place of reading something like Seventeen if she didn’t understand the consequences of her actions. It’s the parent’s duty to make sure their children have the best view of the world they encounter – if you allow Seventeen or weed or whatever to parent your own children, you’re not doing it right. Seventeen helped me to understand that what I wanted for my life could be mine. It made me feel like I had some form of power in my own life when I was still a kid who didn’t quite understand what that meant. Looking back, Seventeen never caused me any issue. But I had a pretty stellar mom to make sure I was seeing the value of reading such a magazine. Point is: the world is hard and contradictory. Nothing, whether it be weed or Seventeen, is going to be good for your children if you allow it to parent them in large doses instead of doing it yourself. Parents should be taught to be parents. Don’t allow the world to do it by itself.

        Report this comment

        • Feel More Better

          Posted on June 28, 2013

          Hey Caroline…thanks for the thoughtful reply. The real point of the piece was just to suggest that we (here) think Seventeen is unhealthy media. It’s not all bad, and no doubt many young girls have gotten a lot of good from it…ours is a subjective opinion of course. And we agree, it’s all about parenting…the reality is, however, no parent parent in isolation of culture, influences, media, friends, neighbors, school…and on. Our real issue with Seventeen is that they strike a pose of “good for girls” when so much of their content reinforces ideals and expectations (of a “perfect” this and a “perfect” that) which is anything but good for girls. That’s our POV. Thanks so much for yours.

          Report this comment

  • Andrea

    Posted on June 30, 2011

    I should preface by saying that I haven’t really looked at Seventeen since about 1999 or so, and therefore can’t comment on it’s current content or emphasis. However, I religiously read Seventeen and YM as a teen and preteen (the word “tween” hadn’t been invented). I honestly have to say that, yes, I do remember myriad exercise and “healthy living” articles, along with mainly conventional, thin and typically white models, and I realize that this may have had an impact on my self-perception.
    However, I also remember many articles dealing with sexual health, STIs, reproduction/contraception, sexual assault, drug use, drinking and sexual consent issues. Although, ideally, a magazine shouldn’t serve as a teenager’s primary means of education and information, I honestly have to give some credit to these magazines for my typically having the most up-to-date sexual health information, for giving me the vocabulary I needed to seek out more information, and for demystifying many difficult topics.
    I now consider myself to a be a fairly well adjusted and confident 28 year old. These days, my bookshelves include Steinem, Wolf, and Wollstonecraft along side the occasional Cosmo, Shape and Woman’s Health, which may make me look like a bit of a hypocrite too!
    I understand the point that is being made, and I applaud the author for starting the discussion. However, I’m not sure that representing Seventeen necessarily means that one can’t also applaud the “love is louder” sentiment. Who knows. Life seems complicated that way.
    Granted, it’s just as likely that it’s a shameless PR move on Ann’s part, and that I’m a hopeless idealist.

    Report this comment

    • OOC

      Posted on July 4, 2011

      You know what, Andrea? Comments and thought like yours are why we do this here @OOC. THANKS. Oh, and in our opinion, no shame at all in being a hopeless idealist. XO, OOC

      Report this comment

  • OOC

    Posted on July 4, 2011

    July 4th update: Hey, it’s us. Not sure when it happened, but Ann has changed her profile pic in the last day or two. Good for her. And even though we probably had nothing to do with convincing her that it was (to some of us) wildly hypocritical…we’re going to pretend it was all our doing (how much you want to bet she’s never even heard of OffOurChests?), and that we had something to do with it. How’s that for hopeless idealism? Xo, OOC

    Report this comment

  • pb

    Posted on August 26, 2011

    I take GREAT exception to the use of the term “bitchslap” on this forum – esp. since we are trying to encourage self-esteem enhancement for women here. That term is used by men who are guilty of domestic violence to mean a method of slapping or hitting a woman that does not leave a mark, so as to not have any proof of injury in the case of law enforcement involvement (or anyone else publicly finding out). Contact a local YWCA if you want more info on this, I’m sure they’d have a lot more to say about it.

    Report this comment

  • OOC

    Posted on August 26, 2011

    pb, thanks for sharing the sensitivity around the phrase. let’s assume it was used with ignorance and not malice…for if we here @OOC used it, that would be so. Thanks again…and you’re right. X

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  • Anonymous

    Posted on February 28, 2012

    I’m 15 and I don’t really agree with this at all… I love Seventeen, and Ann Shoket is one of my idols. I find it to be a bit idealistic, yes, but I think it just promotes being healthy and taking care of yourself, never looking hot for other people or anything. Besides, fashion and beauty can be a form of self expression, can’t it? A lot of people feel their best when they look their best, and it’s for themselves. I’ve found Seventeen to only boost my confidence as a young woman.

    Report this comment

    • OffOurChests

      Posted on February 28, 2012

      Thanks so much for replying (P.S. our lawyers will insist we remind you that the terms of service for ooc require you to be 16…) that said,

      We’re so glad this is what you’ve gotten from it. So glad. We worry that many others walk away without your self-confidence and your feeling better for it. We wish everyone felt as you did…we wish we didn’t feel that Seventeen helps perpetuate the beauty ideals, expectations, standards and norms that leave so many girls (and women) feeling less than. But we do. We think they idealize notions of “perfection” and rap them in words like health. But that’s just us.

      For this moment though, and again, we’re so glad it works for you. As with many things, beauty, value etc are is in the eye of the beholder.

      Wishing you nothing but health and happiness.

      Report this comment

  • Kristina

    Posted on June 14, 2012

    If you’re getting your fashion sense from a magazine…is it still self expression? And as far as this being a parental responsibility….IM engaged to be married and I’ve been discussing with my fiance what to do when we have kids….heaven forbid a daughter. And the only way i see to keep my daughter from seeing these things in our society and having unrealistic expectations for herself is to not take her shopping where she’ll see magazines and
    mannequins, not let her use the internet, and exile television. I think seventeen is better than Cosmo girl, yes. But i have better ideas for what a teen magazine should look like.

    Report this comment

    • FMB (ooc)

      Posted on June 14, 2012

      Thanks, Kristina…yea, it would be great if we could keep our kids in a bubble (we’ve tried) but we can’t. They live in a world beyond our doors…which is why we’re trying to change it.

      Our issue with Seventeen is as much about what they pretend to be as what they are. Cosmo is a beast unto themselves, but at least they don’t pretend to be something they’re not, they’re authentically and unapologetically Cosmo.

      Thanks for adding to the conversation…

      Report this comment

  • Justin

    Posted on June 20, 2012

    It goes way beyond that magazine, its everything from the crap they constantly feed you on the radio minute after minute, hour after hour, the horrible brainwashing mind manipulating reality shows on the “music television stations”. Everything really seems to be completely controlled by an evil organization nowadays.

    This Katy Perry video called “Part of Me” was released a few months back, and if you watch the video, all it is, is underlined US military propaganda. The premise of the video is that this girls boyfriend breaks up with her, and she ends up joining the military to “better strong herself”. Its really f*cked up and creepy what they are telling the kids today.

    I’m a 24 year old guy, and there is no way in hell I would date a girl my age if she read that crap, or watched any MTV religiously, and If I have kids I would definitely not let them watch sh*t like 16 and Pregnant or Jersey Whore. Makes me sick, all of it.

    The sh*t they try to pass off as music on the radio for the last 10 years is all mind controlling garbage, especially the “rap”, but don’t get me wrong, I love real hip-hop. Even when I was younger, I liked what they played on MTV, and it actually opened my mind to how I feel about some things today, but that is the complete opposite of MTV today.
    Today its Lady Gaga telling your kids its okay to be a raging slut. -The more you know!-

    I feel like an old person the way I talk about it, but you can’t feel that way, because these kids are truly being manipulated and made to be more naive than ever about what they watch and read…I totally understand the authors point of view, even if I went a little off topic.
    Not everything on TV is bad, Science channel, discovery, history, etc…Show them some good music from 60s, and 70s, and make sure to show them good books. I’ve got to say smoking pot really helped me figure out that I loved real music, poetry, art, and cinema..
    I know this article isn’t recommending you smoke it, but it definitely won’t hurt your “intellect.”

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